Gifted (2017) 720p YIFY Movie

Gifted (2017)

Frank, a single man raising his child prodigy niece Mary, is drawn into a custody battle with his mother.

IMDB: 7.764 Likes

  • Genre: Drama |
  • Quality: 720p
  • Size: 741.24M
  • Resolution: 1280*800 / 23.976 fpsfps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 101
  • IMDB Rating: 7.7/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 21 / 395

The Synopsis for Gifted (2017) 720p

Frank Adler (Chris Evans) is a single man raising a child prodigy - his spirited young niece Mary (Mckenna Grace) in a coastal town in Florida. Frank's plans for a normal school life for Mary are foiled when the seven-year-old's mathematical abilities come to the attention of Frank's formidable mother Evelyn (Lindsay Duncan) whose plans for her granddaughter threaten to separate Frank and Mary. Octavia Spencer plays Roberta, Frank and Mary's landlady and best friend. Jenny Slate is Mary's teacher, Bonnie, a young woman whose concern for her student develops into a connection with her uncle as well.


The Director and Players for Gifted (2017) 720p

[Director]Marc Webb
[Role:]Chris Evans
[Role:]Lindsay Duncan
[Role:]Mckenna Grace


The Reviews for Gifted (2017) 720p


Reviewed byalexgwchanVote: 10/10/10

the movie is fantastic. i absolutely love it and the acotrs andactresses are amazing, Mckenna Grace who plays Mary and Chris Evans whoplays Frank is absolutely suited for the role. The young actress,Mckenna Grace is a very talented girl and actress, and Chris Evans isamazing as the Uncle role. They are so great with each other, that iswas so touching when they were together. i believe that this movie willbe one of the greatest in the world. I LOVE IT!

Interesting premise weighed down by a messy plotReviewed bydmcarefuldriverVote: 6/10

With better writing and a more focused plot line, this could've been a great movie. As it stands, it's merely okay.

The story is about the relationship between a child prodigy and the man raising her, who himself is a pretty interesting guy with an unconventional background. Actually, that's not really the story – that's what it should've been. Instead, it's a sloppy courtroom custody battle with a pointless romantic subplot that feels like something you'd see on a lesser episode of Suits. There are some interesting moments in the courtroom scenes, but they feel somewhat out of place in what should be a more character-driven story.

The execution suffers most in the third act, in which new characters are introduced on a whim and the movie further loses sight of its central premise. This movie does know what message it wants to deliver, but it gets way too caught up in the specific motivations of each character. I can't really say any more without spoiling, but I will say that the ending, given the problems that are set up earlier in the film, was less than satisfying for me.

If you really love child prodigy movies, this one might be worth an iTunes rental a month from now. But for now, you're better off staying home and re-watching Good Will Hunting, which does everything this movie tries to do but with far better execution and emotional resonance.

how do we choose who chooses?Reviewed byDavid FergusonVote: 7/10

Greetings again from the darkness. The "right" choice isn't always obvious. Things get more complicated when even the "best" choice isn't clear. Place a young child at the heart of that decision tree, and the result may yield emotional turmoil and an abundance of moral high ground and judgment. Such best intentions are at the core of this latest from director Marc Webb (his first feature since 500 Days of Summer) and writer Tom Flynn.

Frank (Chris Evans) is raising his 10 year old child prodigy niece Mary (Mckenna Grace) in low-key small town Florida. The circumstances that brought the two of them together aren't initially known, but are explained in a poignant moment later in the film. Frank has been home-schooling Mary and now believes it's time she transitions to public school for the socialization aspect ? "try being a kid for once" he urges. Of course, Mary's teacher Bonnie (Jenny Slate, Obvious Child) immediately realizes Mary is special, and just like that, the wheels of the educational system are in motion to explain to Frank why they know what's best for Mary ? a high-fallutin private school where she can be all she can be.

There is a really nice and enjoyable story here of Uncle Frank dedicated to doing what he thinks is best for bright and charming and spirited young Mary, but it all comes crashing down when the bureaucrats, and ultimately Frank's mother (Lindsay Duncan), get involved. When the adults can't agree on the best route for Mary, a courtroom battle ensues. Ms. Duncan gets a witness scene reminiscent of Jack Nicholson in A Few Good Men, and her overall performance stands in effective stark contrast to the warm fuzzies of Mr. Evans.

The supporting cast contributes nicely, though Octavia Spencer's role as kindly neighbor Roberta is more limited than it should be, and the love connection between Evans and Ms. Slate could have easily been omitted - but she is so pleasant on screen, that we don't mind at all. Glenn Plummer and John Finn are the attorneys who go to war, and Fred the one-eyed cat also gets plenty of screen time. But there is little doubt that the movie really belongs to the effervescent Miss Grace. She nails the back and forth between kid and genius, and we never doubt her sincerity.

Child prodigies have been explored through other fine movies such as Little Man Tate, Searching for Bobby Fisher, and Shine, and while this one may run a bit heavier on melodrama, but it's worthy of that group. The best discussions after this movie would revolve around what's best for the child. Should she be deprived of "higher" education in order to live within a more "normal" social environment? Are any of the adults more interested in their own ego than in what's in the child's best interest? Home school vs public school vs private school is always good for some fireworks, and everyone has their own thoughts. So how do we decide who gets to decide? Does a parent get the final say on their child – even if their motivations may be in doubt? Should every kid be pushed to their academic – or artistic – or athletic – limits? The questions are many and the answers are complicated. There is a great line in the film that itself is worthy of conversation: "You got on the bad side of a small-minded person with authority". Yikes. Even Cat Stevens' great song "The Wind" can't soften that.

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